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Support our ride and the on-going climate solutions work of Cool Planet and Citizens’ Climate Lobby.

See a map of our ride.              See the calendar of events.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK!postcard

Add your voice!  

Fill out a postcard to your US Representative and US Senators telling them why you are concerned about climate change.  We will hand-deliver these in Washington, DC when we arrive.  Click here or on the image to the right.

 

We Made It!

Thanks to all who joined us on Sunday to make the ride into DC a special event and a great ending to our bike across the country.  Now the work continues for climate solutions…

img_0074Join Mindy at the Midwest Mountaineering Outdoor Adventure Expo for her presentation on the trip and how you can get involved:

Saturday, November 19 3:30 – 4:30 pm

U of M Hanson Hall, Room 102

More information here.

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Upcoming Events!

 

Cycling Toward Climate Solutions

Mindy Ahler and Ryan Hall are biking 4000 miles across the US this fall to inspire conversations on climate. Hear about their trip and join the conversation:

 Wednesday, November 9, 2016

7:00 -8:30 PM

Conference room at YMCA, Cumberland, MD

(601 Kelly Road, Cumberland, MD)

For more information and to see their route: 

LowCarbonCrossings.org, or on FB, or #Bike4Climate on Twitter

LowCarbonCrossings@gmail.com, or 612-810-4664 (Paul)

Cycling Toward Climate Solutions

Mindy Ahler and Ryan Hall are biking 4000 miles across the US this fall to inspire conversations on climate. Hear about their trip and join the conversation:

 Thursday, November 10, 2016

7:00 -8:30 PM

At Town Hall, Hancock, MD

(Small meeting room, 126 High St., Hancock, MD 21750)

For more information and to see their route: 

LowCarbonCrossings.org, or on FB, or #Bike4Climate on Twitter

LowCarbonCrossings@gmail.com, or 612-810-4664 (Paul)

 

Join us in DC for the grand finale

Bicyclists and climate champions are joining Mindy Ahler and Ryan Hall for the last leg of their 4,000 mile cross-country bike trip from Oregon to Washington, DC. The journey, called LowCarbon Crossings, is an opportunity for the two climate volunteers to speak with people throughout the country about climate science, the action we can take to create a livable future and cycling as a healthy, carbon-neutral way to see the world. We will accompany them on their final stretch on the C&O Canal tow path from Old Angler’s in Potomac MD to the US Capitol. There are three options—1) a round trip ride of 32 miles, 2) a one-way ride of 16 miles (requires self-transport to Old Angler’s), 3) a four mile fun ride from Georgetown. Or just join us at the Capitol for speeches followed by a dinner reception!

OPTION 1: ROUND TRIP, 32 MILES

11:30—12:00: Meet at the General Grant statue at the U.S. Capitol reflecting pool, west side http://bit.ly/2fiuFEV
12:00: depart for Old Anglers on the Capital Crescent trail, switch to C&O Canal tow path at Fletcher’s Boat House.
1:30: Arrive at Old Angler’s; we will meet at the CANAL BRIDGE along the tow path between mile 13 and mile 12; there is a sign market “ANGLER’S” at this point. From MacArthur Blvd. the bridge can be reached by walking down the path across the street from Old Angler’s Inn–the distance is about 200 yards and there are some stairs. DO NOT WAIT AT OLD ANGLERS INN PARKING LOT. (note: there are bathrooms at Angler’s along MacArthur Blvd).
2:00 Depart along C&O Canal Tow Path
3:30 Arrive at Capitol
4:00 Reception and speeches

OPTION 2: ONE-WAY, 16 MILES
(riders must arrange for their own transport to Old Anglers)

1:30: Arrive at Old Angler’s; we will meet at the CANAL BRIDGE along the tow path between mile 13 and mile 12; http://bit.ly/2ffsUdf
There is a sign market “ANGLER’S” at this point. From MacArthur Blvd. the bridge can be reached by walking down the path across the street from Old Angler’s Inn–the distance is about 200 yards and there are some stairs. DO NOT WAIT AT OLD ANGLERS INN PARKING LOT. (note: there are bathrooms at Angler’s along MacArthur Blvd).
2:00 Depart along C&O Canal Tow Path, rest of schedule same as above.

OPTION 3: GEORGETOWN TO CAPITOL FUN RIDE, 4 miles

3:00 (approx.): Meet at Georgetown Waterfront Park—in park at terminus of Wisconsin Ave under Whitehurst Freeway. http://bit.ly/2fw91Ca
3:30 Arrive at Capitol
4:00 Reception and speeches

The C&O towpath is not paved. hybrid bikes, mountain bikes or cross bikes are recommended.  Here’s one option for renting a bike in DC to join the fun: http://bikeandrolldc.com/rentals/

Those who are not bicyclists can join too! Come to the Capitol at 3:30 for photos and to welcome our riders (http://bit.ly/2f2ti00). We will follow with a reception at HUNAN DYNASTY on Capitol Hill where Mindy and Ryan will share about their experience and how they spoke about the climate to folks across the country. CCL volunteers and the public are welcome to join this reception where dinner will be available for purchase.

Hunan Dynasty: 215 Pennsylvania Ave SE, Washington, DC 20003

For more on the Low Carbon Crossings trip: https://lowcarboncrossings.wordpress.com

Sharing the load

Today Akeem rode with us and carried two of my panniers on his bike.  It was a great gift to me to be able to share the load and be much lighter going up hills.

sharingWe are now in Pennsylvania and nearing the end of our trip – Just 8 days left.  This journey would not have been possible without the many people who have shared our load.  img_4332 It is impossible to name all the amazing people who have helped us across the country.  The countless people who have fed us, planned a location for a community conversation, spread the word and advertised, to those who have given us directions and helped us find our way and the many who have housed us for a night or more.

Like this bike trip, solutions to climate change take some heavy lifting.  We have a big problem that requires some major shifting of our energy production, our land use, our daily habits, etc.  We are sharing the load with many others to move us forward.  To the brave native peoples (and their allies) who are at Standing Rock and on the Mississippi in Iowa to protect our waters from new fossil fuel infrastructure, to the school superintendent trying to put solar on the school roof, to farmers looking for more sustainable ways of farming and trying new methods, to students moving their schools and communities toward greater sustainability (and the teachers who guide them in exploring new ways), to media reporters telling the story of the changes happening and the solutions being pursued, to countless volunteers and citizens working with their legislators and local governments on policy to address carbon emissions – we have met all of these along our trip and we are all sharing the load.  We need more help, so invite your friends to join in.  As one of our hosts kept telling us “we’re all in this together.” By sharing the load we can get the job done.

Mindy

The states are whizzing by

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John riding Paul and Mindy out of Omaha and up the first two hills

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Crossing the Mississippi – my hometown (St. Paul) is just upstream

It seems I was just writing about South Dakota and Nebraska – and now we are already across Iowa and Illinois and into Indiana.  Time goes fast when you’re pedaling hard.  In Iowa we had conversations nearly every night – in Greenfield, lunch in Des Moines, Pella, Fairfield.  We met lots of great people and got some media coverage in Pella.  I learned more about farming in Iowa – different perspectives in different parts of Iowa.  We also got to see lots of rolling hills in Southern Iowa – not all of Iowa is flat.  We had the night off in Muscatine to enjoy a dinner out with Paul and Anne before they headed back to Minnesota (Paul biked over 500 miles with me from Sioux Falls to Omaha and all across Iowa) and had time to repack our bags and send a few extra things home before we were carrying all our stuff againimg_4117

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We survived the Terror in the Timber

Though the bikes are heavy, it feels good to be carrying all our stuff again – being fully self-contained.  We crossed the Mississippi at Muscatine – another milestone and reminder of home.  We also had two nights of camping the first nights in Illinois.  Temps were fairly
warm – only down to about 40 degrees at night and we survived the “Terror in the Timber” near Cambridge.  Might be the last days of pleasant weather camping.  We are now working on finding places to stay for the rest of the trip that won’t require so much exposure to the outdoors – though often still making use of our sleeping bags inside.  It was fun to return to Wenona, IL after having visited there to inspect that portion of the route in June (on our way to the CCL conference).  Had some great conversations over breakfast at the Boardwalk.  Thank you to Ed and Crystal for a respectful conversation. We disagree on climate change but agree on caring for the environment. Their kindness and honesty is greatly appreciated and a model of civility showing that we can disagree and still converse with each other. Thanks Ed for the good bike route tip. We took your suggested route.  Thanks also to Vicki, Judy and Marge for filling out postcards on why they are concerned about climate change – we will deliver them in DC.

Last night was the third and last night in Illinois with a Warm Showers host in Chebanse.  Doug,

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Our host in Chebanse riding with us to St. Anne, IL

our host, then suggested a better route for us today and joined us for the first 12 miles.  Thought we’d seen a lot of wind turbines in Iowa – we’ve seen a lot more of them in Illinois.
We have now entered Indiana and are staying with another Warm Showers host on a farm outside Rensselaer.

I don't remember Indiana having so many trees - lots of beautiful ones today

I don’t remember Indiana having so many trees – lots of beautiful ones today

Hard to believe that we are already on our 10th state!   Only two more nights in Indiana and we are on to Ohio.  It’s a whirlwind.  Speaking of wind, it continues to be our greatest friend and greatest challenge depending on the day.  Tail winds push us along and head winds – even when only 5 to 10 MPH – mean for a long, slow slog.  We had three days in a row of over 70 miles each and still had to work hard for the 50 miles today.  Tomorrow is a little shorter, then back to a couple challenges again.  May the winds be with us!